Hartwell Meadow

Year Acquired / 2018
Size / 5.3 acres
Properties / 5

This scenic and productive hay field located at the northern boundary of Concord provides a link in the conservation corridor of Spencer Brook, joining protected land in Carlisle to the 172 acres that CLCT has conserved in the upper Spencer Brook Valley over the course of 40 years. 

Hartwell Meadow, farmed since the late 1600s, was part of a productive farming agricultural area in northwest Concord from the 17th to the 20th century. In acquiring this property, CLCT is reinforcing the work that so many others have done to preserve the farming heritage of the neighborhood, including Vic and Mary Tyler who placed a conservation restriction on the 15 acres of hayfield immediately adjacent to Hartwell Meadow. 

Features

hayfield, trail connection

Trail Conditions

There are no developed trails on this property at this time. At an opening in the treeline on the south side of Hartwell Road, a trail leads across private property south to Westford Road; from there, one can connect to our Spencer Brook valley trail system. The owners of the hayfield across which the trail runs allow the public to enjoy this access; please behave respectfully.

Entrances / parking

None.

Explore the Land

With the help of our members and neighbors, CLCT has successfully completed the acquisition of Hartwell Meadow in 2017, a scenic and productive 5.3-acre hayfield at the border between Concord and Carlisle. This was the first time that CLCT purchased land by exercising the right of first refusal (ROFR) under Chapter 61A, the agricultural land tax. In doing so, we had to match the price that the owners had received through a bona fide offer to purchase – $775,000 for the single-family house lot that was the permitted use of this land under a prior subdivision approval.

Ralph and Ruth Howe tilling soil across the street from Hayes farm. Ralph is driving the tractor and Ruth is handling the plow behind it.

This was the first time that CLCT purchased land by exercising the right of first refusal (ROFR) under Chapter 61A, the agricultural land tax. In doing so, they had to match the price that the owners had received through a bona fide offer to purchase – $775,000 for the single-family house lot that was the permitted use of this land under a prior subdivision approval. The ROFR process is set by law, and CLCT had only 90 days to raise the remainder of the funds.

View from Betty’s house of hay bales on Hartwell Meadow (Photos courtesy of Betty Meehan). Since the purchase was accomplished, the Land Trust has placed a conservation restriction on Hartwell Meadow; this is a requirement of exercising the ROFR that adds an additional layer of protection to the property. The Duffy family is continuing to hay the field for their dairy farm.

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The land regulations

Please stay on marked trails

Leave the land as you found it

Do not remove plants, wildlife, stones, or historical artifacts

Carry out litter and dog waste and dispose of properly

Dogs must be under control at all times

Please observe posted restrictions for horses and bicycles

No camping, fires, or hunting (except by special permission)

No alcoholic beverages

No motorized vehicles except to provide ADA access